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Rev. Fidel/Pastor

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Reflections  32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

  “I confess one baptism for the forgiveness of sins and I look forward to the resurrection of the dead (1) and the life of the world to come (2).”
We celebrated, a few days ago, the solemn commemoration of all the faithful departed; and we are still in a climate of reflection and prayer for our dear dead. The sad pilgrimage that brings so many people to cemeteries during the month of November is a gesture of piety and affection, and a choral manifestation of faith and ecclesial communion.
These two articles of the Apostolic Creed take on a singular meaning in the light of the memory of the deceased faithful. They remind us that we are heading towards nothing. On the contrary, our existence has a precise goal and faith opens, in the midst of the sadness of human separation, the bright horizon of a life that goes beyond this earthly existence and that will be the port of arrival for all children of God, in Jesus Christ.
Today’s readings present us with the theme of the Resurrection, not of Christ, but of our resurrection.
“You accursed fiend, you are depriving us of this present life, but the King of the world will raise us up to live again forever
“It is my choice to die at the hands of men with the hope God gives of being raised up by him;
Let us ask ourselves this question: What begins to change in you and me when we believe in the resurrection?

The first reading teaches us that the person who believes in the resurrection knows that the powers of this world do not have the last word. This happened to the seven young brothers, who were convinced that the oppressive power they were suffering at that time, did not have the last word. If there is something beyond death, then the powers of this world that only reach death, are over.
That is why there is no greater force to live the present life than to believe with certainty and foundation in what comes after death. Jesus Himself says that God is a God who will resurrect them: They can no longer die, for they are like angels; and they are the children of God because they are the ones who will rise.
The Sadducees had everything they could need or aspire to in this life. Therefore, when a person like the Sadducees had everything materially, they did not think of death or resurrection.
For the Sadducees, the saddest thought, the most absurd, was the problem of death, because it was the finale, there it ended.
We who follow in the footsteps of martyrs, of our dead, we who strongly believe in the resurrection, then we have a strength, a conviction that makes us live this life in a different way.
Now the question is: Are we taking seriously what we Catholics say in our creed: We believe in the forgiveness of sins, in the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come? Amen Fr. Fidel